Local Context Matters to Women’s Lives: A Report from Delhi

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 31, 2010June 21, 2017By: Sara Stratton, Director, MNCH/FP Programs, IntraHealth InternationalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post was originally published on IntraHealth’s Global Health Blog.To the business world, it’s location, location, location. Here in Delhi, though, at the Global Maternal Health Conference, the mantra is context, context, context. There are many ways to improve and save women’s lives, but the success of any given intervention depends on local context. What works in one country or one community may not work in another. Many people here are talking about the importance and value of understanding how and why an intervention succeeds or fails at the local level. This means investigating and evaluating not just how widely an intervention reaches or the quality of the services, but also the specific, local factors that play into its uptake and impact. How do these realities affect whether an intervention that saved lives in one place would work equally well somewhere else?This idea of the importance of the local context became woven into presentations on the first day of this groundbreaking conference. In one session, a representative of the SEWA Rural Society for Education, Welfare and Action, Rural (SEWA Rural) talked about how they had found that in Gujarat, India, a woman’s decision to deliver at home or in a hospital in her last pregnancy often influences where she delivered in a subsequent pregnancy. The question for us all to ponder was raised: is the key to saving women’s lives to encourage them all to deliver in hospitals? If so, how much would this cost? Can governments really afford this now? How far would women have to travel to a hospital? The reality, though, is that for some communities, encouraging hospital- or health facility-based delivery may be part of the answer, but in others it may still be an impractical approach. This question led to a discussion about home delivery versus institution-based delivery—as well as the value of traditional and trained birth attendants.Whether we are talking about where women deliver, how they deliver, who helps them deliver, what we are really talking about is how we evaluate and minimize a woman’s risk during pregnancy and childbirth. Where distance and a lack of health facilities make facility-based delivery improbable, a community may need programs that improve the quality of care offered by trained birth attendants during a home delivery even though in an ideal world there would be another option. What I’m hearing in Delhi is, in some ways, what I already know. There are no easy answers. We must support communities to succeed within the context of their own limitations in terms of the availability of and access to health facilities and health workers. At the same time, we have to remain committed to helping communities to change these limitations.Sara Stratton is the director of MNCH/FP programs at IntraHealth International.Stay up to date with the conference happenings! Follow the Maternal Health Task Force and EngenderHealth on Twitter: @MHTF and @EngenderHealth. The conference hashtag is #GMHC2010.For more posts about the Global Maternal Health Conference, click here.For the live stream schedule, click here.Check back soon for the archived videos of today’s presentations.Share this:last_img read more

National Youth Championships day one – Girls’ division

first_imgBy BEN HARRISSome cricket-like scores featured in the girls’ division on day one of the National Youth Championships at Sunshine Coast Stadium on Wednesday.Queensland Secondary Schools Touch and New South Wales Combined High Schools both went to town on their opposition with the two giants of the division having an easy day.QSST scored 39 touchdowns and conceded two in their opening three matches while NSWCHS crossed 38 times and had their defence breached on five occasions.QSST nearly wrote the history books with their 23-0 thumping of Western Tigers. It was two touchdowns short of the all-time record, which coincidently is held by QSST when they defeated Victoria 25-0 in 2011.NSWCHS had a big win against cross-school rivals New South Wales Combined Independent Schools, running in 15 touchdowns to zip.Not surprisingly the two heavyweights are undefeated after day one.New South Wales Combined Catholic Colleges are also undefeated after winning their three matches on day one.They had two close matches against New South Wales Touch Association Development Team (4-2) and South West Queensland Swans (5-3).NSWCCC are second in Pool A behind QSST on percentage. The Swans are third with South Australia heat coming fourth.NSWCHS lead Pool B with Brisbane City Cobras in second and NSWCIS in third.There are plenty of ways to keep up-to-date with all of the latest results, news and information from the 2014 National Youth Championships (NYC). The Touch Football Australia and NYC websites will be updated regularly throughout the event with all of the latest information and can be found by clicking on the links below: www.nyc.mytouchfooty.com www.touchfootball.com.au All of Touch Football Australia’s social media pages will be regularly updated throughout the NYC event, so be sure to ‘like’ and ‘follow’ us by clicking on the links below. Facebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustralia Twitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus (be sure to use the hashtag #nationalyouthchamps) Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustralia (be sure to use the hashtag #nationalyouthchamps) The TFA YouTube channel will also have highlights and game live streamed throughout the event. Please click on the link below to be taken to the channel, and be sure to become a subscriber to the channel – www.youtube.com/touchfootballausRelated LinksGirls’ NYC day onelast_img read more