Barrier islands protect coasts from storms, but are vulnerable too

first_img Please enter your name here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Hurricane Season 2018By Anna Linhoss, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Mississippi State University and first published on theconversation.com.When hurricanes like Florence make landfall, the first things they hit often are barrier islands – thin ribbons of sand that line the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts. It’s hard to imagine how these narrow strips can withstand such forces, but in fact, many of them have buffered our shores for centuries.Barrier islands protect about 10 percent of coastlines worldwide. When hurricanes and storms make landfall, these strands absorb much of their force, reducing wave energy and protecting inland areas.They also provide a sheltered environment that enables estuaries and marshes to form behind them. These zones serve many valuable ecological functions, such as reducing coastal erosion, purifying water and providing habitat for fish and birds.Many barrier islands have been developed into popular tourist destinations, including North Carolina’s Outer Banks and South Carolina’s Hilton Head and Kiawah. Islands that have been preserved in their natural state can move with storms, shifting their shapes over time. But many human activities interfere with these natural movements, making the islands more vulnerable.Ocean City, Maryland is built on Fenwick Island, an Atlantic barrier island. USACEIslands on the moveBarrier islands are made of sandy, erodible soil and subject to high-energy wave action. They are dynamic systems that constantly form and reform. But this doesn’t necessarily mean the islands are disappearing. Rather, they migrate naturally, building up sand in some areas and eroding in other areas.New islands can form out in the ocean, either because local sea level drops or tectonics or sediment deposition raises the ocean floor. Or they may shift laterally along the shore as currents carry sediments from one end of the island toward the other. On the East Coast, barrier islands usually move from north to south because longshore currents transport sand in the same direction.How longshore drift moves sediment along a beach. 1=beach. 2=sea 3=longshore current direction 4=incoming waves 5=swash 6=backwash USGSAnd over time many barrier islands move landward, toward the shore. This typically happens because local sea levels rise, so waves wash over the islands during storms, moving sand from the ocean side to the inland side.Building on shifting sandsBuilding hard infrastructure such as homes, roads and hotels on barrier islands interrupts their lateral migration. Needless to say, beach communities want their dunes to stay in place, so the response often is to build control structures, such as seawalls and jetties.This protects buildings and roads, but it also disrupts natural sand transportation. Blocking erosion up-current means that no sediments are transported down-current, leaving those areas starved of sediment and vulnerable to erosion.Many sandy tourist beach towns along the East Coast also turn to beach nourishment – pumping tons of sand from offshore – to replace sand lost through erosion. This does not interrupt natural sand transportation, but it is a very expensive and temporary fix.For example, since the 1940s Florida has spent over US$1.3 billion on beach nourishment projects, and North Carolina has spent more than $700 million. This added sand will eventually wash away, quite possibly during Hurricane Florence or the next hurricane to hit the coast, and have to be replaced.What kind of protection?In some cases, however, leaving barrier islands to do their own natural thing can cause problems for people. Some cities and towns, such as Miami and Biloxi, are located behind barrier islands and rely on them as a first line of defense against storms.And many communities depend on natural resources provided by the estuaries and wetlands behind barrier islands. For example, Pamlico Sound – the protected waters behind North Carolina’s Outer Banks – is a rich habitat for blue crabs and popular sport fish such as red drum.Landsat image of North Carolina’s Outer Banks enclosing Pamlico Sound. NASAUnmanaged, some of these islands may not move the way we want them to. For example, a storm breach on a barrier island that protects a city would make that city more vulnerable.Here in Mississippi, a string of uninhabited barrier islandsoff our coast separates Mississippi Sound from the Gulf of Mexico. Behind the islands is a productive estuary, important wetlands and cities such as Biloxi and Gulfport. Because the Mississippi River has been dredged and enclosed between levees to keep it from spilling over its banks, this area does not receive the sediment loads that the river once deposited in this part of the Gulf. As a result, the islands are eroding and disappearing.To slow this process, state and federal agencies are artificially nourishing the islands to keep them in place and preserve the cities, livelihoods and ecological habitats behind them. This project will fill a major breach cut in one island by Hurricane Camille in 1969, making the island a more effective storm buffer for the state’s coast.When to retreat?Geologically, barrier islands are not designed to stay in one place. But development on them is intended to last, although critics argue that climate change and sea level rise will inevitably force a retreat from the shore.Reconciling humans’ love of the ocean with the hard realities of earth science is not easy. People will always be drawn to the coast, and prohibiting development is politically impractical. However, there are some ways to help conserve barrier islands while maintaining areas for tourism activities.First, federal, state and local laws can reduce incentives to build on barrier islands by putting the burden of rebuilding after storms on owners, not on the government. Many critics argue that the National Flood Insurance Program has encouraged homeowners to rebuild on barrier islands and other coastal locations, even after suffering repeated losses in many storms.Late-night host John Oliver critiques federal flood insurance.Second, construction on barrier islands should leave dunes and vegetation undisturbed. This helps to keep their sand transportation systems intact. When roads and homes directly adjacent to beaches are damaged by storms, owners should be required to move back from the shoreline in order to provide a natural buffer between any new construction and the coastline.Third, designating more conservation areas on barrier islands will maintain some of the natural sediment transportation and barrier island migration processes. And these conservation areas are popular nature-based tourism attractions. Protected barrier islands such as Assateague, Padre and the Cape Cod National Seashore are popular destinations in the U.S. national park system.Finally, development on barrier islands should be done with change in mind and a preference for temporary or movable infrastructure. The islands themselves are surprisingly adaptable, but whatever is built in these dynamic settings is likely sooner or later to be washed away. The Anatomy of Fear Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSHurricane Season 2018theconversation.com Previous articleCookies and Milk with a Cop this morningNext articleNew cars lose $3,000 annually from this single expense Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Iraqi opposition TV station’s staff to be charged with terrorism

first_img News Help by sharing this information JordanMiddle East – North Africa Organisation Reporters Without Borders deplores a Jordanian state security court prosecutor’s decision yesterday to bring terrorism charges against Amman-based Iraqi opposition TV station Al-Abasiya’s owner and 13 journalists, three days after their arrest during a police raid and the station’s closure.RWB calls for the immediate release of all those detained during the raid, and the withdrawal of all charges.A judicial source told Agence France-Presse that the prosecutor was accusing the 14 detainees of “using the Internet to carry out acts that exposed Jordanians to attack.” They are facing possible five-year jail sentences.Jordan’s broadcasting commission separately told AFP that Al-Abasiya had been broadcasting illegally from Jordan, without a licence.Jordan is ranked 141st out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. Receive email alerts Follow the news on Jordan June 15, 2020 Find out more August 12, 2020 Find out more Two Jordanian TV journalists arrested after broadcasting criticism of lockdown June 13, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Iraqi opposition TV station’s staff to be charged with terrorismcenter_img to go further JordanMiddle East – North Africa News RSF_en Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives Jordan bans coverage of teachers’ protests News News April 14, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Government releases guidance on accompanied viewings for estate agents

first_imgHome » COVID-19 support » Government releases guidance on accompanied viewings for estate agents previous nextCOVID-19 newsGovernment releases guidance on accompanied viewings for estate agentsMinistry of Housing confirms viewings can take place but warns that open houses and driving clients to viewings are still prohibited.Nigel Lewis13th May 20201 Comment19,325 Views The government has this morning published more detailed guidance on the health and safety aspects of the property market re-opening today, which it says will not be a ‘return to normality’.“The process of finding and moving into a new home will need to be different given those involved in the process will have to adapt practices and procedures to ensure that the risk of spread of coronavirus is reduced as far as possible,” the guidance says.It has also been confirmed that virtual viewings are to be encouraged as a key way for buyers to find their ideal home to rent or buy prior to nailing down a final list to view.The government wants agents to request that members of the public conduct virtual viewings as much as possible and that open house events are still not permitted.Agents are to be allowed to accompany viewings as per normal but must observe strict two-metre social distancing procedures where possible, ensure all doors in the property are opened, windows are opened too and that wash basins are made available for hand cleaning.But agents should not drive clients to viewings and are urged to offer clean paper towels for vendors, buyers and tenants to use during viewings to wash their hands. Keys must also be washed in between viewings.The guidance also reveals that all ancillary activities within the property rental and sales process may resume including surveys, EPC assessments, removals, conveyancing, and the preparation of homes for sale – including the use of tradespeople to complete this – as well as visits to future homes to measure up or have building work done prior to moving in.Read the guidance in full. property viewings May 13, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 13th May 2020 at 3:10 pmFantastic that the government are actually encouraging tech in agency, which is not just a temporary gimmick but an efficiency and great tool for agents to sharpen up their processes.Imagine reducing failed viewings that result in no revenue by just 10% a year how much time and money would that save? What would you team be able to do with that time, and the consumers view more of what they want, and the health and safety issues of Covid-19 are minimised.For me the ‘Proptech = more profit in your business’ and means less human interaction by having automated systems and solutions, which increases health and safety for clients and the sales teams is an obvious solution.Alternative – be a financially wounded dinosaur like Countrywide – which is about as agile as a 12m long 700kg prehistoric animal can be in the 21st century – Tyrannosaurus anyone ‘tyrant lizard’.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

November 15, 2003 Disciplinary Actions

first_img November 15, 2003 Disciplinary Actions The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended seven attorneys, disbarred one, reprimanded nine, placed one on probation, and accepted the resignation of another.The following lawyers are disciplined: Terence Millard Brown, P.O. Box 40, Starke, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1979) Brown failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; and failed to cooperate with the responsibilities of partner or supervisory lawyer. (Case no. SC03-40) Steven Edward Cohen, 800 N.W. 62nd St., Ste. 200, Ft. Lauderdale, suspended from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective retroactive to June 1, following a September 11 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) Cohen was charged on April 15 with a conspiracy to structure financial transaction to avoid the reporting requirements of Title 31, United States Code and Code of Federal Regulations, a felony. (Case no. SC03-1174) Hugo Enrique Dorta, 1221 Brickell Ave., Miami, suspended by emergency from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective 30 days following a September 3 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1990) A review of Dorta’s trust accounts revealed a misappropriation of client funds. (Case no. SC03-1456) Andrean Rose Eaton, 6122 Washington St., Hollywood, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 30 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. Eaton is further placed on probation for one year. ( Admitted to practice: 1995) Among several Bar violations, Eaton failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation; and violated or attempt to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct. (Case no. SC02-2707) Randall Joel Etheridge, 423 N. Baylen St., Pensacola, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a September 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Etheridge was charged with fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer in vehicle pursuit, a felony, and was placed on probation for 30 months. (Case no. SC03-1563) Ralph Stanley Francois, 1820 N.E. 163rd St., Ste. 106, N. Miami Beach, reprimanded for professional misconduct. ( Admitted to practice: 1997) Francois failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to provide competent representation to a client; failed to make reasonable efforts to expedite litigation; and violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct. (Case no. SC03-1544) Arlene Lloyd Han, 1628 S.E. 13th Terrace, Cape Coral, suspended from practicing law in Florida for one year, effective immediately following a September 11 court order. Han is further placed on probation for three years and must enter into a contract with Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) Han violated or attempt to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so; and committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer. (Case no. SC03-493) Leslie Phyllis Holland, 370 Minorca Ave., Ste. 11, Coral Gables, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) Holland allegedly violated trust accounting records and procedures. (Case no. SC03-1011) Philip Timothy Howard, 1471 Timberlane Rd., Ste. 115, Tallahassee, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1987) Howard failed to document his authority in every instance to execute a document on behalf of co-counsel. (Case no. SC02-1148) Louis Michael Jepeway, Jr., 19 W. Flagler St., Ste. 407, Miami, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following a September 25 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1968) Jepeway failed to properly represent his client in that he did not adequately keep his client reasonably informed as to the status of a case; failed to conduct any discovery or comply with client’s request for information; and failed to properly communicate and represent his client. (Case no. SC03-1604) Arthur H. Lipson, 801 N.E. 167th St., Ste. 312, N. Miami Beach, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following a September 18 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1970) Lipson filed non-meritorious claims and contentions, expedited litigation, and communicated with person(s) represented by counsel. (Case no. SC03-1457) Dennis Anthony Lopez, 210 N. Pierce St., Tampa, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 28 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1981) Lopez charged or collected excessive fees and violated contingency fee rules. (Case no. SC02-1690) Randy Edward Merrill, P.O. Box 413005, Naples, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following a September 25 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) Among several Bar violations, Merrill failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and violated rules regulating trust accounts. (Case no. SC03-926) Donald Eugene Pervis, P.O. Box 22107, Sarasota, permanently disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a September 18 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Pervis continued to practice law in Florida after entering into a disciplinary resignation in May. (Case no. SC03-1169) Robert Eugene Tamm, 408 N. Wild Olive Ave., Daytona Beach, suspended by emergency from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective 30 days following a September 3 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) A review of Mathis’ trust accounts revealed a misappropriation of client funds. (Case no. SC03-1159) Steven Edward Waggoner, 302 Manatee Drive, Ruskin, resigned with leave to seek readmission after three years, following a September 11 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) Among several Bar violations, Waggoner failed to comply with continuing legal education or basic skills requirements; neglected to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and did not respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel. (Case no. SC03-449) Richard P. Warfield, 201 E. Government St., Pensacola, placed on probation for one year, effective immediately following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1949) Warfield placed an advertisement in the phone book, which was not in compliance with the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. (Case no. SC02-2232) Theodore Willard Weeks III, 2000 S. Florida Ave., Lakeland, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following a September 11 court order. Upon his reinstatement, Weeks shall commence serving a three-year probation, which includes signing a rehabilitation contract with Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) Weeks allegedly knew of a conflict of interest and did not fully disclose to a client the possible effect of that conflict; caused injury or potential injury to a client; and knowingly engaged in conduct that was a violation of a duty owed as a professional and caused injury or potential injury to a client, the public, or the legal system. (Case no. SC03-565 and SC03-1220) W. Alan Winter, 310 Third Street, Neptune Beach, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following a Sept. 18 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1984) Winter made false and reckless accusations that a judge was biased and politically influenced by his decisions and engaged in conduct that is prejudicial to the administration of justice for knowingly disparaging the judge, opposing counsel, and the integrity of the jury. (Case no. SC01-2603) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. Disciplinary Actionscenter_img November 15, 2003 Disciplinary Actionslast_img read more

Big crowd enjoys season championship night at CJ

first_imgCOLUMBUS JUNCTION, Iowa (Aug. 21) – The largest crowd of the year came out on Friday night to cheer on their favorite drivers on a near perfect weather night at the CJ Speedway. Mincer Ford of Columbus Junction sponsored the season championship races. By Jerry Mackey  All 2020 IMCA point standings become official on Oct. 26. Cody Staley continued his mastery of CJ Speedway, wrapping up the track title with his seventh consecutive Mach-1 Sport Compact feature win.  Tenth starting Damon Murty broke out of the pack just past the midway point to take control of second. A lap 13 caution bunched the field on the restart the battle was on for the lead. Murty used both the high side and the bottom before shooting past Gordon and into the lead on lap 16. The IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature took the green with Howard Gordon Jr. setting sail from his outside front row starting position. Gordon led the first half of the race while a fierce battle was waged by a pack of contenders for second. Adam Bell, who has been a late race charger all year finished strong by taking second and stamped his name in the record books by becoming the track champion.last_img read more

Keane bows out with farewell goal

first_imgIn transfer news last night, three Irish internationals were involved in deadline day moves.Jeff Hendrick has joined Burnley from Derby County for a club record fee of 10.5 million pounds.Meanwhile, Aiden McGeady joined Preston North End on a season-long loan, and Eunan O’Kane joined Leeds United from Bournemouth for an undisclosed fee. Ireland’s record goal-scorer and most-capped player marked his final appearance in green with a 68th – and final international goal, during last night’s 4-0 win over Oman.Keane says he couldn’t have hoped for a better farewell.last_img