ActionAid Recycling launches latest Mobile Phone Amnesty

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Trading ActionAid Recycling launches latest Mobile Phone Amnesty The Mobile Phone Amnesty was first established in 2005 as a means to increase awareness of the work ActionAid Recycling does and highlight the fact that some 15 million unwanted phones are discarded each year in the UK alone.ActionAid Recycling collects empty printer cartridges, unwanted mobile phones and PDA’s to be reused and recycled. ActionAid Recycling also sells new cartridges. ActionAid Recycling pays to ActionAid 10% of sales generated from donated ink and toner cartridges, PDA’s and mobile phones. In 2005 this equated to 75% of the business profits of ActionAid Recycling. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img ActionAid Recycling has launched its latest campaign to persuade people to donate their unwanted mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs) to raise funds for its founder charity ActionAid. Every participant will be entered into a prize draw for each handset they send for recycling.Prizes on offer include a Fujitsu Siemens AMILO Pro laptop with Windows XP, A Solio charger, and an organic hamper.The Mobile Phone Amnesty runs throughout December 2006 and January 2007 and aims in particular to attract people who have been given a new handset for Christmas, leaving them with an older but still functioning model. Advertisement  29 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 21 November 2006 | Newslast_img read more

USDA Research Shows Moisture Benefit of No-Till Farming

first_img SHARE USDA Research Shows Moisture Benefit of No-Till Farming By Gary Truitt – Aug 30, 2012 Facebook Twitter Previous articleUSDA Releases FY 2012 & 2013 Export ForecastsNext articlePurdue Economist Predicts Record Losses For Pork Industry Gary Truitt SHAREcenter_img Source: NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter USDA’s Agricultural Research Service has conducted studies to determine how standing crop residues affect snow accumulation and soil water levels across entire fields. A USDA soil scientist studied two neighboring farms in the Palouse region in eastern Washington. Both have hilly topography – but one farm has been under continuous no-till management since 1999. The fields on the other farm were conventionally tilled. Snow depths, density and soil water storage were measured at hundreds of points across the fields on both farms for two years. The residue height at data collection points was also measured on the no-till fields. USDA says the findings show that no-till management can ensure blanket coverage of snow in the winter – which can help boost dryland crop productivity in the summer.According to the study – standing wheat residue on the no-till farm significantly increased the amount and uniformity of snow cover across the entire field. Snow depths ranged from four to 39-inches – with an average depth of 11 inches. Snow depths on the conventionally tilled field ranged from zero to 56 inches – with an average depth of 8.5-inches. USDA notes the snow distribution pattern on the no-till farm made soil water distribution more uniform and increased soil water recharge rates. USDA’s soil scientist calculated that the greater storage of soil water in no-till systems could increase winter wheat yield potential by 13 bushels per acre on ridge tops, six bushels per acre on south facing slopes and three bushels per acre in valleys. This could increase winter wheat profits for regional farmers by an average of 30-dollars per acre and as much as 54-dollars per ridge-top acre.According to USDA – producers affected by the 2012 drought might also benefit from using no-till to increase the amount and uniformity of snow cover on their fields. This would increase soil water recharge rates and soil moisture storage – which would facilitate the return of drought-stricken fields to their former productivity. Home News Feed USDA Research Shows Moisture Benefit of No-Till Farminglast_img read more